Study suggests link between low vitamin D and adverse pregnancy outcomes

rabiA new study from the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Medicine by has shown there is a significant link between vitamin D insufficiency and adverse health outcomes in mothers-to-be and newborns. The study was published in the British Medical Journal on March 26.

The study’s lead author is Dr. Doreen Rabi, an endocrinologist and member of the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta and Institute for Public Health.

Researchers carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of all existing evidence on the effect of vitamin D concentration on pregnancy and birth outcomes. Observational data has suggested a link between low vitamin D and increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes such as gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, risk of infections, caesarean section, and fetal growth restriction such as low birth weight. Knowledge of these associations is however limited.

Data from 31 studies, published between 1980 and 2012 and with between 95 and 1,100 participants, were included in the analysis. Differences in study design and quality were taken into account to minimize bias.

Results showed that pregnant women with insufficient vitamin D were at a 49 per cent increased chance of developing gestational diabetes, a 79 per cent increased chance of developing preeclampsia, a 187 per cent increased chance of developing bacterial vaginosis and an 85 per cent increased chance of giving birth to a baby small for gestational age. No significant differences were found in birth length and head circumference.

“These results are concerning given recent evidence that vitamin D insufficiency is common during pregnancy, especially among high risk women, vegetarians, women with limited sun exposure and ethnic minorities with darker skin,” says the study’s first author, Dr. Fariba Aghajafari, a family physician and member of the University of Calgary’s Institute for Public Health. “Fortunately, optimizing vitamin D intake in expectant mothers may be a simple way to reduce the risk of these adverse outcomes.”

While the findings identify a significant association, researchers stress the need for further studies to be done.

“There remains a need for large, well-designed randomized controlled trials to determine whether strategies to optimize vitamin D concentration are effective in improving pregnancy and neonatal outcomes,” says the study’s lead author Dr. Doreen Rabi, an endocrinologist and member of the University of Calgary’s Institute for Public Health and the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta. “Future studies should look at the dose-response relationship between vitamin D supplements and adverse health outcomes.”

Dr. Doreen Rabi is supported by Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions.

RELATED MEDIA COVERAGE

“Vitamin D important during pregnancy, Calgary study finds” CBC News

“Low Vitamin D levels linked to problems in pregnancy” Globe and Mail

“Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to problems in pregnancy” Calgary Herald

“Expecting? Why Vitamin D is good for both mom and baby” Global News

“Tuesday on Calgary Today with Angela Kokott” 770 News – Calgary Today

“Vitamin D important during pregnancy, Calgary study finds” CBC News

“Low Vitamin D Could Make for Tough Pregnancy” MedPage Today

“Vitamin D Benefits New Moms” Daily RX News

“Maternal Vitamin D Insufficiency Linked to Adverse Outcomes” MedScape

“Vitamin D in pregnancy reduces risks” irishheath.com

“New studies make case for vitamin D supplementation” Troy Media

“Vitamin D Deficiency Could Cause Severe Pregnancy Complications” The Stir

“Lack of Vitamin D Associated to Health Problems in Pregnancy” TopNews USA

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