Hemmelgarn and Scott-Douglas in NEJM

Leading nephrologists within the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta have yet again been published in the highest impact medical science journals.

 

Dr. Nairne Scott-Douglas and Dr. Brenda Hemmelgarn (right)

New England Journal of Medicine

Dr. Brenda Hemmelgarn along with Dr. Nairne Scott-Douglas (co-Investigator) – both members of the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta – led a randomized trial at 11 sites across Canada. Their research found that hemodialysis patients receiving the usual catheter locking solution of heparin were twice as likely to suffer a catheter malfunction and were at an almost three-fold increased risk of blood stream infection as compared to those who receive rt-PA (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator) once a week.

“We now have evidence that we can prevent these complications using rt-PA, with a goal to ultimately improve outcomes for patients with kidney failure,” says Hemmelgarn.

You can read the rest of the press release on the UCalgary Medicine web-site.

This story was covered by numerous television, print and web media outlets. Some of the coverage included the CBC, BT Calgary, Montreal Gazette, Business Week, and the Vancouver Sun.

Original research can be found on the web-site of the New England Journal of Medicine – January 27, 2011 edition.

Circulation

Dr. Matthew James along with Drs. William Ghali, Merril Knustdon, Brenda Hemmelgarn – all members of the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta – conducted a retrospective study of 14 782 adults who received coronary angiography in Alberta between 2004 and 2006 using data from the APPROACH database. The study found that the adjusted risk of death, end-stage renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy, subsequent hospitalizations for heart failure and acute renal failure, all increased with increasing severity of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) after percutaneous coronary revascularization procedures. These findings will certainly inform the controversy surrounding AKI after angiography.

Original research can be found on the web-site of Circulation – February 1, 2011 edition.

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